About Ladakh

The region of Ladakh was formed 50 million years ago by the collision of the Indian sub-continental tectonic plate with the Asian land mass. Today it is an uplifted high altitude desert, mostly devoid of vegetation, and sculpted over millennia into fantastic contours by wind and water erosion. It is bordered on the north by the Karakorams and on the south by the Himalayas, with the Indus River valley and tributaries forming its central heartland. Ladakh ranges in altitude from 8,800 feet in Kargil to 25,170 feet at Saser Kangri in the Karakorams. The capital city, Leh, is at 11,500 feet.

Ladakh lies in the rain shadow north of the main Himalayan chain and is little affected by the summer monsoon that pounds India to the south. Summer weather is generally hot and sunny during the day and cool to cold at night. However, during the trekking season, altitude and topography can cause weather extremes, including relentless sun, excessive heat, bitter cold, high winds, dust storms, and hail and snow in the mountains.
Ladakh or ’Little Tibet’, is one of the most remote areas north of the Himalayas on the Tibetan Plateau. Isolated for centuries from the outside world due to its geographic location, it occupies a strategic position on India’s northwest frontier, with some areas today closed to tourism.

One of the few remaining places in the world where Tibetan Buddhism is practiced in its original form, Ladakh’s rich cultural and religious heritage is present in its ancient monasteries and centuries-old tradition of Sowa Rigpa (Tibetan medicine). Based upon Buddhist texts and the use of medicinal plants, Sowa Rigpa continues today to be a trusted, affordable, effective system of village health care.